Inspo: Lazy Luxury

There’s a style I’ve been feeling a lot recently that I thought was worth a ramble. The name I tend to use for it is lazy luxury;  I’ve also heard the term casually wealthy used. It’s all about dressing in super elegant, luxurious garments, but with a disheveled, lazy, comfortable vibe. Picture the kind of shit you’d wear if you were a romanticised caricature of a Manhattan playboy: so rich that everything you own exudes luxury, but equally so rich that you don’t need to impress anyone, so you make no effort to be “presentable”.

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The main styling cues for this look arise from corrupting traditional #menswear styling with excessive doses of comfort and decadence. So you’ve got fairly traditional pieces like blazers, trousers, and loafers, but with a big presence of luxurious fabrics like silk, velvet, and cashmere (plus lighter stuff like linen for more summery looks). You’re gonna go for comfier details like natural or unstructured jackets, and slightly more relaxed pants. You’re also gonna wear everything in a lazier way: think unbuttoned shirts, messed-up cuffs, fuck-it tucks… all those details that basically indicate that you kinda just rolled out of bed and meticulously sculpted your perfectly disheveled look threw on the first outfit you could grab.

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A bunch of designers play with these kinda vibes to varying degrees. The two most obvious choices are my boys Haider Ackermann and Dries Van Noten; both make extensive use of luxurious fabrics and details, while consistently pushing a relaxed, disheveled, lazy vibe. Other brands to check out include Etro, Lanvin, and Ralph Lauren Purple Label.

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Of course, while luxury is the name of the game, you don’t necessarily need to drop stacks on big designers to pull this off – the right pieces from more classic or basic brands can look dope too. The key thing to aim for is the paradoxical intersection of formalwear and pyjamas. Here are a couple of examples:

  • Suede or velvet loafers. Are they dress shoes? Are they slippers? What’s the difference? Why not both?
  • Striped, plaid, or otherwise patterned trousers. Are they half a statement suit, or half a pyjama set? Both loose, flowy cuts and tigher stretchy ones can work very well.
  • Long-ass lightweight drapey coats. Linen, wool, silk are all good options. Here you’re looking for that overcoat / dressing-gown duality, so something like a belted closure is a great option. Similarly, some kind of noragi or kimono type deal can do the same thing.
  • To up the “elegance” a little, a velvet smoking jacket. Nothing screams luxury more than velvet, and with soft shoulders and a relaxed draping cut you’re still super comfy. I think I read somewhere that the smoking actually evolved from the dressing gown, so really it’s basically loungewear.
  • Aggressively soft sweaters. Bonus points for exotic wools like cashmere, alpaca, mohair etc. Turtlenecks are particularly great for maximum coziness.

The above list is a good starting point, but more often than not almost any item made from a suitably luxurious material can work – particularly silk and velvet. Essentially anything sufficiently soft with a bit of a lustre can do the job.

I’m gonna finish the rambling here and just dump the rest of my inspo photos for this look. Where possible I’ve linked each photo to the website or IG page of its owner, so check some of those out (this is also true of the earlier photos)

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